This site will look much better in a browser that supports web standards, but it is accessible to any browser or Internet device.


Clubs, glossaries, museums, shops and much more......

glue-it.com

...all of your model making needs from one site.







Supermarine Spitfire Book Review

By: Paul Oliver

This is a personal review and the opinions expressed by the reviewer should be regarded as a personal comment.

I have to admit to usually being a bit sceptical of book reviews because the style that a book may be written in could differ from that of a reader, and the two may be at odds. So why then did I feel it necessary to review a book? Well to be honest there are not too many books around that can be deemed to be a good guide for modellers. I only recently became aware of a new publication which could be useful to the aero modeller, and felt that it should be drawn to the attention of fellow modellers.

The book is titled "The Supermarine Spitfire, Part 1: Merlin Powered", and is described as a comprehensive guide for the modeller. The author is Robert Humphreys, and is published by SAM Publications, ISBN 0-9533465-2-8, and is the third in a series of to date five books, that includes the Griffon powered variants of Spitfire, Hawker hurricane, De Havilland Mosquito, and Avro Lancaster.

The book is described in the preface as being for the static scale model maker, and is also popular with the radio control modeller. I have been one of the former, and am certainly one of the latter. To be honest, having read the book I feel that the description is perfect, and that the book is a must have for any serious modeller contemplating building a model of the Spitfire.

The book is effectively split into two parts. The first is a history of the Merlin powered variants, while the second gives details on modelling different variants. These are supported by a number of appendices giving additional information to support both parts, and include some nice scale drawings to boot.

The book starts with the evolution of the various marks of Merlin powered aircraft from the prototype through to Mk XVI, and includes a couple of chapters on the Seafire, and use by the Belgian Air Force. The text is supported by a number of good quality photographs. I found the information to be very useful and provides food for thought for the modeller contemplating a possible subject.

The chapters detailing modelling the aircraft, while aimed predominently at the static scale modeller building from a plastic kit, provide considerable information of interest to the r/c modeller. Not least of which are a number of colour schemes, sketches of cockpit interiors and drawings giving panel detail. All of this is of use to the modeller.

Overall this book is 176 pages of good information for the modeller looking at building a model of the Spitfire. I would have to say that this book is a must have. Many modellers spend a great many hours researching a particular subject. This book can cut that time down substantially and aid in selection of a particular aircraft. This is the first in this series that I have bought, and I have to admit that I am looking at getting the others not necessarily because I am looking at building those aircraft types at this moment in time, but may do in the future. There are not many books on the market geared towards modellers. When one comes along, if it is good, it is worthwhile shouting about to others. This is one such book.


Supermarine Spitfire Book Review Addendum

This is an addendum to my earlier review on part 1 the Merlin powered variants of the Supermarine Spitfire. Since that review I have since obtained a copy of part 2.

The book is titled "The Supermarine Spitfire, Part 2: Griffon Powered", and is described as a comprehensive guide for the modeller. The author is Robert Humphreys, and is published by SAM Publications, ISBN 0-9533465-4-4, and is the fifth in a series of to date - five books, that includes the Merlin powered variants of Spitfire, Hawker Hurricane, De Havilland Mosquito, and Avro Lancaster.

I will not repeat my comments made in my earlier review. However, I will say that this second part to the Spitfire story is to the same standard with 176 pages of information and details relating to the various variants of Spitfire, Seafire, Spiteful and Seafang of which all were powered by the Rolls Royce Griffon engine.

Again the book is split into two parts, the first being the history of the aircraft types, while the second details modelling the aircraft.

Comparing both books, they are both to the same high standard, and it is this reviewer's opinion that any model maker would want to have these on their bookshelf. They provide all of the information one would need to make any representative model, and provide a good insight to the development of the aircraft. This book has only reinforced my comments in the last paragraph of my original review.

By: By Paul Oliver