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A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


Candlestick

CandlestickThis candle stick is 12.5mm high or at 1/12 scale this equates to a fullsized candlestick 150mm (6 inches) high.


Carpets


Casement Windows


Ceiling


Cellar


Ceramic Tiles


Chessboard

Chessboard

A chessboard may be constructed by first sticking alternate planks of light and dark wood together (at 1/12 scale the squares on the chessboard should be approximately 3mm square, therefore, the planks of wood should be 3mm thick). Nine planks in all need to be sandwiched together. The resulting block of wood must be left to dry before being sliced into planks (the result will be light and dark coloured striped planks) 3mm thick. These planks need to be glued back together with each plank being offset from the next (one one way, the next the opposite way). This is why nine planks were glued in the first place. Again this must be left to dry. Once dry the block of wood may be trimme to form a square section. Edging may then be applied in layers around the outside. Again this should be left to dry before finally slicing the block into thin chessboards.

It is important to choose woods with a tight grain to stop the dust from the dark wood impregnating the light wood and so spoiling the effect.

See also: Tables.


Chevron

Zig-zag moulding (12th century).


Chimney


Chimney Pots


Cladding


Clapboard

Clapboards are thin, narrow boards of tapering cross-section applied horizontally as siding on wood-frame houses. Each clapboard overlaps the one below, so that no joints are exposed to the weather.


Clocks

Longcase Clocks made by Roy LouisBoth of these longcase clocks actually work. The faces are etched brass and the movements modern quartz watches stripped to the bare minimum. Made by: Roy Louis


Cob

Unburnt clay mixed with straw.


Coffee Pot

Coffee Pot


Column

A column is a pillar, usually of round cross-section but sometimes square or octagonal, used to support the roof of a building, porch, or portico. Parts of a column are (bottom to top): base, shaft and capital. Columns are important design elements in Classical Revival and Neoclassical house styles. The most traditional columns follow the "Greek" and "Roman" orders (e.g., Doric, Ionic, Corinthian, Tuscan, etc., varying primarily in details of the capital) as documented by Andrea Palladio and other architects of the Italian Renaissance (14th-17th centuries). Excavations of Pompeii and Herculaneum in the 18th century revealed much more variation in the design of ancient columns than previously suspected.


Compound pier

A pier composed of a group or cluster of members, especially characteristic of Gothic architecture.


Conservatory

A conservatory is a greenhouse attached to a house. In the 18th and 19th centuries, the collecting of exotic plants and the production under glass of out-of-season flowers and fruits were popular pastimes among those who could afford this kind of luxury. Grapes and oranges, as well as orchids and other tropical flowers, were among the products of upper-class conservatories. The most elaborate conservatories were warmed by wood- or coal-heated air introduced through under-floor ducts.


Corbel

A projecting wall member used as a support for some element of the superstructure. Also, courses of stone or brick in which each course projects beyond the one beneath it. Two such structures, meeting at the topmost course, creates an arch.


Corner-entry

The corner-entry house, a common substyle of Greek Revival, has an asymmetrical facade in which the main entry door is located at one end, adjacent to a front corner of the building.


Cornice

A cornice is an ornamental molding, or composition of two or more moldings, located at the exterior wall-roof junction of a building, beneath the eaves, and/or beneath the sloping ends of a gable roof.


Cottage


Course

Level layer of stones or bricks.


Crenelated

Notched or indented, usually with respect to tops of walls, as in battlements.


Crocket

A projecting, foliate ornament of a capital, pinnacle, gable or buttress.


Crosswall

An interior dividing wall of a castle.


Cupola

A cupola is a short windowed tower, or dome, typically located in the center of a flat or low-slope roof. Many Italianate houses have cupolas.


Curtain

A connecting wall 'hung' between towers of a castle.


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z