This site will look much better in a browser that supports web standards, but it is accessible to any browser or Internet device.


Clubs, glossaries, museums, shops and much more......

glue-it.com

...all of your model making needs from one site.








A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z



Gable End

A gable is that part of an exterior wall, above the level of the eaves, which conforms to the inverted-V configuration of the roof rafters.


Gable Front & Wing

This term refers to an L- or T-shaped house plan in which a gable end of the main block faces the street, and a wing is attached at a ninety-degree angle to the rear portion of the main block. The gable-front-and-wing vernacular Greek Revival house was perhaps the most frequently built design of the late 19th century in New England, New York and the upper Midwest, particularly in rural areas.


Gable Roof

A roof in which two opposite sides are supported by sloping rafters, the walls of the other two sides being extended upward in an inverted-V shape conforming to the slope of the rafters, is known as a gable roof. The majority of American houses have gable roofs.


Gallery

The second story of an ambulatory or aisle. Also a long passage or room.


Garderobe

Latrine; privy.


Gargoyle

In archiecture, a waterspout, often in the form of a grotesque.


Georgian

The Georgian style (1700-1780) is named for the English kings of the 17th and 18th centuries (Georges I, II, III and IV). Classical Georgian houses are characterized by having:

  • their long axis parallel to the street
  • a symmetrical front facade with a central entry and usually two windows on either side, echoed in two-story examples by a row of five windows above
  • either a massive central chimney (most common in the North) or a pair of chimneys, one at each end of the house (most common in the South).

Early Georgian houses are simpler, and often have gable roofs (frequently dormered) and floor-to-ceiling wood paneling in some of the rooms. Late Georgian houses are more complex and ornate, often having hipped roofs and one-third-height paneling.

Glass

Glass vase - Roy LouisCreating the right look with glass objects is not easy. One way is to use glass. Although, this is a real challenge unless you happen to be very experienced in working with glass. Some objects may be constructed from perspex. The results can be very impressive.


Glazing

See also: Glass.

Glue

A huge number of glues are used by model makers. A general guide to their use is included here, but for more detailed uses, limitations and hazards the individual manufacturers recommendations should be followed.

Gluing material A to material B - look up the type of material you want to glue to a different type of material and get an idea of the glue and a hint as to what type of glue is best.


Gothic

An architectural style prevalent in western Europe from the 12th through the 15th century and characterized by pointed arches, rib vaulting, and flying buttresses.


Great chamber

The lord's solar, or bed-sitting room.


Groined

A roof with sharp edges at intersection of cross-vaults.


Grotesque

In art, a kind of ornament used in antiquity consisting of representations of medallions, sphinxes, foliage, and imaginary creatures.


Guttering


Gypsum

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z