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H0 Gauge

The Track width of H0 Gauge is 16.5mm.

See also: Gauge.


Halt (or station halt)

A railway station with minimal facilities where trains will usually stop only on request.


Hand Points

A set of points which are actuated by an individual, track-side hand- lever.


Hand Rail

A long holding rail attached to a railway vehicle, the most common being the one running the length of a locomotive boiler.


Hand-Rail Stanchions

Stand-off rods which are screwed onto the side of a vehicle body, and onto the end of which a hand rails attached.


Hand Signals

Used, mainly by shunters and guards, to indicate required movements to drivers.

By Day
Arm moved horizontally: Move towards me.
Arm moved in vertical circle: Move away from me.
Hand moved up and down from wrist: Move slowly.
One arm held vertical above head: Acknowledge signal.
Both arms held vertical above head: STOP
One fist moved vertically above head: Create a brake (ie charge air or vacuum brake system ready for use)
ANYTHING WAVED FRANTICALLY: EMERGENCY STOP

By Night
White light moved from side to side: Move towards the light.
Green light moved from side to side: Move towards the light slowly.
White light moved up and down: Move away from the light.
Green light moved up and down: Move away from the light slowly.
Red light held steady: STOP
Red light moved up and down: Create a brake (ie charge air or vacuum brake system ready for use)
ANYTHING WAVED FRANTICALLY: EMERGENCY STOP

Head Boards

Discs which when fitted to the lamp irons on the front of a train or locomotive indicate the head-code.


Head-Cod

The arrangement of head-boards or head-lamps on the front of a train which indicate to a signalman, or other railway employee, the type of train, or route to be taken by the train.


Head-Lamps

Small lights on the front of a train or locomotive the positioning of which displays the appropriate head-code for the train.


Head Shunt

A length of line connecting a number of sidings and providing a means of shunting the sidings without occupying adjacent running lines.


Header

A steam distributing vessel into which a number of tubes are inserted.


Head-Stock

Component of a locomotive, carriage or wagon under-frame which goes across the extreme end of the vehicle, and onto which the buffers and draw-gear are mounted. (N.B. the buffer shanks and draw-gear may pass through the head-stock and act, via springs, on other parts of the under-frame structure). Also commonly referred to as the Buffer Beam.


Home Signal

In the normal direction of travel on any one line, the first stop signal encountered at a block post, is the home signal. On some railways and in some railway parlance, all stop signals are called home signals.


Horn Blocks

Inverted U-shaped blocks which are attached to cut outs in the side of a frame, and into which axle-boxes fit are free to slide up and down.


Hornby

Frank Hornby made his first clockwork train in 1905.


Horn Cheeks

The sliding surfaces of horn blocks.


Horn Stay

A removable stay which closes the gap at the bottom of a horn block between the horn cheeks.


Horse Box

A railway vehicle constructed for transporting horses.


Hot Box

An overheated axle box. Usually the result of insufficient lubrication, or excessive speed.


Hump Shunting

A system of shunting where vehicles are propelled up one side of a hump at the throat of a fan of sidings, and then allowed to run down the other side of the hump to their required location.


Hump Yard

A marshalling yard used in hump shunting.


Hydrostatic Lubricator

A small amount of steam is taken from the regulator when open and fed into a condensing coil (usually mounted on the cab roof), the resulting water draining into the hydrostatic lubricator where it displaced the oil. The oil thus displaced is fed to the pistons and cylinders to lubricate them while the engine is in motion with the regulator open. For this reason the regulator should be left slightly open when coasting. This type of lubricator was mainly used on GWR locomotives.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z