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Ladder of Points

A series of points leading to sidings, which all diverge from the same approach track.


Lamp Iron

A metal bracket on the front or back of a railway vehicle, onto which a lamp or destination disc can be connected.


LBSC

Curly Lawrence, known as LBSC, was one of Britain′s most prolific and well known model or scale-steam-locomotive designers.



Leading Wheels

Locomotive carrying-wheels which are forward of the driven wheels.


Leaf Spring

A vehicle suspension-spring consisting of a number of plates bolted together.

Leaf Spring Equations - great page about leaf springs at diracdelta.co.uk.


Level Crossing

A place where a road or railway route crosses another railway route on the same level.


Lever Frame

A framework in which levers are pivoted for controlling the movement of points and signals.


Lifting Link

A link between the reversing crank and the valve gear of a steam locomotive. Also commonly referred to as the reversing link.


Light

Railway term for a carriage window.


Light Engine

A locomotive travelling without any attached rolling stock, or with just a brake van in tow.


Light Railway

Railway operating under the terms of a Light Railway Order. Axle loads were restricted to 8 tons which made such railways much cheaper to construct and maintain. This also allowed for a relaxation of certain safety rules which applied to main-line railways, such as lack of fencing provision and simplified signalling systems, in exchange for a very much lower (often 25 mph) speed limit. Many heritage railways operate under such orders, although much of the regulatory framework is now replaced by the recent Railway Safety Case provisions and Transport and Works Act legislation.


Limit of Shunt

A position on a railway track, usually marked by a notice of such, which represents the limit for any shunting movements.


Little-End

The bearing, on the cylinder end of a connecting rod.


Live Steam Valve

Controls the supply of steam to the live steam injector.


Loading Bank

A platform in a goods yard for loading and unloading wagons.


Loading Dock

See: Dock.


Loading-Gauge

The loading-gauge is a specification of the maximum widths and heights to which all railway vehicles traversing a given route must comply.

A device, often seen at the exit to a goods yard, which consists of a curved bar which overhangs the track. The height of the bar above the rails represents a portion of the loading-gauge so that loaded wagons may be easily checked to ensure they are within the loading gauge.


Locking Frame

A lever frame which is constructed in such a way that a lever cannot be reversed if it would result in conflicting signals being displayed, or conflicting routes to be set.


Locomotive

A self-propelled railway vehicle in which no accommodation for a pay load is provided, and which is capable of providing the motive power for other vehicles coupled to it.


Locomotive Shed

A building used to house locomotives.


Locomotive Testing Plant

A building where a locomotive can be set up to run on rollers and then, under controlled conditions, driven without actually moving.


Locomotive Works

A factory or depot where locomotives are built and overhauled.


Loop

A line parallel to a running line, which by virtue of crossovers between the two lines, enables one train to pass or overtake another.

A length of track which turns back and crosses itself at a higher elevation.


Loop Line

A secondary railway route which diverges from a main route, and then joins the main route again at another location.


Loose Coupled

Railway vehicles which have no continuous brakes and are coupled by loose links of a chain or Instanter couplings.


Loose-Coupled Train

A train consisting of loose-coupled vehicles.


Loose Shunting

A process of shunting in which a vehicle, which is not coupled to the shunting locomotive, is propelled forward and then allowed to continue moving under its own momentum. Also known as fly shunting.


Lower-Quadrant Signal

A semaphore signal in which the signal arm is lowered from the horizontal to give a clear indication.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z